“Oh man, another Hockeyville column?”

Now I know I’ve already written about it once before this past month, but you’re going to have to give me a pass on this one because it just seems that every week this story gets more and more exciting.

Now I know I’ve already written about it once before this past month, but you’re going to have to give me a pass on this one because it just seems that every week this story gets more and more exciting. As you’ve probably guessed by now, I’m talking about Nakusp’s Hockeyville bid.

Two columns ago I very nonchalantly “asked” residents if they would go out and submit a story or two about hockey and Nakusp.

Since then, the amount of stories submitted has tripled.

I’m not even hinting that I had anything to do with that, because I know the limits of my power, and this column has very little, if any, ability to sway your emotions. That was all from the gusto of the people organizing the Hockeyville bid, mainly Andrea Coates.

But after attending the Rally in the Valley this past Friday, I just knew I would have to write another column about this thing for this issue, because by the time this comes out, there’s only a few more days left to vote.

Basically, I just want to say that win or lose, this village has truly proven itself in a major fashion. I’m talking about how a small place such as this has beaten out hundreds of other cities and villages across the entire country (hopefully that still rings true by this Wednesday…).

I wouldn’t be surprised if by the end of the submission period there was more than 100 stories submitted into the Hockeyville bid for Nakusp.

After perusing the other communities and just doing some quick math about how many people live in places such as oh, I don’t know, VANCOUVER, I would say Nakusp has done a damn fine job in pulling together and pumping out these stories.

I was also almost baffled by the turnout at the arena Friday night.

I knew there would be a pretty solid number, but I didn’t know I was going to have to find another place to park, since the arena parking lot was already full by the time I got there.

When I entered the arena, I felt the excitement that was pulsing through the room. Or maybe it was the shots of vodka beforehand.

Just kidding.

Seriously though, it was heartwarming to see kids running around dressed in red and white, faces painted and dragging along helium balloons while their parents managed to be even louder than they were.

I’m looking at you, man with a trumpet that night.

There were boxes of Kraft dinner all over the place for noise makers, ambassadors handing out stickers to kids, volunteers giving out pucks and gloves and shirts for sale.

It was absolutely awesome to see how many people wore either the Kraft shirts or the asked for red and white outfit.

It almost made me feel bad for wearing my regular clothes, but I like to think I’m so naturally red and white being a ginger and all that I got away with it. Also I was behind the camera.

But as the night went on, and the hockey game winded down to a finish and people headed back out to their cars, it was easy to tell that everyone there had a good time.

Now, we all know I’ve plugged this enough times to seal the BP oil spill, but, for me, your friendly neighbourhood gingerly reporter, would anyone who hasn’t submitted a story just write up a little, itty bitty piece and add a photo? For me?