Louisiana Pacific has announced it is temporarily shutting down its oriented strandboard mill at Fort St. John B.C., while continuing production at its Grande Prairie, Alberta plant. Norbord has announced its 100 Mile House OSB plant is closing indefinitely. (Wikimedia Commons)

Louisiana Pacific has announced it is temporarily shutting down its oriented strandboard mill at Fort St. John B.C., while continuing production at its Grande Prairie, Alberta plant. Norbord has announced its 100 Mile House OSB plant is closing indefinitely. (Wikimedia Commons)

LETTER: British Columbia’s forest industry crisis being made worse

Andrew Wilkinson warns of regulatory overload by John Horgan’s NDP

In the past few weeks we’ve seen shift curtailments, mill slowdowns, and complete shutdowns across the province. The fact that Canfor – one of the companies to announce cutbacks – is only curtailing its operations in B.C., not in Alberta or any U.S. state, should be a red flag for Premier John Horgan.

Couple that with the fact that NDP policies are being imposed on forestry-dependent communities without consultation and that the industry lost 6,600 jobs between 2017 and 2018, and it’s hard to deny that B.C. is in a crisis. As recent weeks have shown, 2019 is shaping up to be even worse.

Horgan needs to immediately start working with the forestry communities that are paying the price for his government’s irresponsible policies. I’ve written him a letter asking for him to take action, starting now.

The NDP needs to engage right away with the federal government to look at supports for impacted workers and their families. My suggestion is to ensure workers and contractors who have lost their jobs or had their hours cut have first access to work on wildfire mitigation projects.

RELATED: B.C. forest companies get first test for new licence rules

RELATED: B.C. layoffs aim to stop falling wood product prices

The NDP needs to make amends and engage with forestry companies and unions to start regaining British Columbia’s competitiveness. This should include an immediate reduction on stumpage fees and the carbon tax on the forestry industry. The Premier also needs to establish an all-party industry competitiveness committee to ensure a healthy sector now and in the future.

Meanwhile, Horgan and the NDP are sitting on their hands as our forest industry bleeds jobs in every corner of the province. They seem intent on ignoring those red flags or even acknowledging that their policies, such as Bill 22, which effectively gives the government a veto over cutting rights transfers between forest companies, are failing an entire sector of our economy.

More than 140 forestry-dependent communities and countless small businesses are feeling the pressure as Horgan has made British Columbia the jurisdiction with the highest production costs on the continent.

In the 1990s, the NDP brought in the Forest Practices Code, which strangled the forestry industry with red tape and made us one of the highest-cost producers of timber in the world. The NDP’s previous mistakes added $1.8 billion per year to the forestry sector’s production costs and now they are at it again.

Bill 22 was only introduced a month ago, after zero industry consultation, and since then we have already witnessed the announcement of imminent closures or indefinite shutdowns of four mills. Tolko’s Quesnel sawmill, Canfor’s Vavenby sawmill, Norbord’s 100 Mile House oriented strandboard mill and Louisiana Pacific’s Peace Valley OSB mill, along with announcements of production curtailments or downtime at more than 30 other Interior mills.

This is absolutely unacceptable to hard-working British Columbians. Countless families rely on the forestry industry to put food on their tables and support their children. The fact that Horgan is making tough times even harder by creating greater industry uncertainty and burdening companies with more red tape and higher taxes is a slap in the face to every one of those families.

We have reached the point where it no longer makes economic sense to do business here. The NDP needs to govern for the entire province, not just their union and insider friends in Victoria and the Lower Mainland.

In 2016, under the B.C. Liberal government, we had nearly 60,000 direct forestry jobs. In just two years under the NDP, that number has dropped to around 50,000, with many more indirect jobs lost as well. The numbers for 2019 are only going to get worse while the NDP continues down this path.

Andrew Wilkinson, MLA, Vancouver-Quilchena, B.C. Liberal Leader

BC legislature

Just Posted

The KBRH Gratitude Mural by Tyler Toews was unveiled at Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital on June 9. L-R: Kala Draney, third year med student, Dr. Scot Mountain, Diane Shendruk from IH, Dr. Carolyn Stark, Dr. Sue Benzer, Dr. Kristen Edge, James Brotherhood, Dr. Dennis Small, and Dr. Sue Babensee. Photo: Submitted
Kootenay Boundary doctors offer a healthy dose of goodness with Gratitude Mural

Its red ribbon is in the shape of a heart rising above a Kootenay Boundary mountain scene

A cougar, or cougars, went on a killing rampage at a small Fruitvale farm. Photo: Thomas S. on Unsplash
Cougar euthanized after taking out small animal farm in Fruitvale

Wildlife interactions, poachers or polluters should be reported to RAPP at 1.877.952.7277

Daryl Jolly, his wife Kerry Pagdin, their sons Cole Jolly (left) and Graeme Jolly, and their dogs Gracie and Clover. Photo: Submitted
Selkirk College arts chair diagnosed with lung cancer, family launches fund drive

Daryl Jolly co-founded the college’s digital arts program

TELUS is proposing to construct a 5G tower at Pople Park. Photo: Sheri Regnier
First 5G tower in Trail proposed for placement in popular park

TELUS has a consultation process open until June 28

The border crossing on Highway 11 in Abbotsford heading south (file)
VIDEO: Western premiers call for clarity, timelines on international travel, reopening rules

Trudeau has called Thursday meeting, premiers say they expect to leave that meeting with a plan

St. Joseph's Mission site is located about six kilometres from Williams Lake First Nation. (Photo submitted)
Williams Lake First Nation to search residential school site for unmarked graves

St. Joseph’s Mission Indian Residential School operated from 1886 to 1981

Tuesday’s Lotto Max draw went unclaimed. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Tuesday’s Lotto Max draw went unclaimed. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lotto Max jackpot goes unclaimed again

42 of the 64 Maxmillion prizes of $1 million were won, the majority were sold in Ontario

FILE - This July 6, 2017 file photo shows prescription drugs in a glass flask at the state crime lab in Taylorsville, Utah. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
Contaminants in generic drugs may cause long-term harm to DNA: B.C. researcher

Scientist says findings suggest high volume overseas facilities require strict regulation

Restaurant patrons enjoy the weather on a patio in Vancouver, B.C., on April 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Labour shortages, closed borders major obstacles to B.C. restaurant, tourism restarts

Industry expert says it won’t start to recover until international travellers can visit

(Black Press Media file)
Dirty money: Canadian currency the most germ-filled in the world, survey suggests

Canadian plastic currency was found to contain 209 bacterial cultures

(pixabay file shot)
B.C. ombudsperson labels youth confinement in jail ‘unsafe,’ calls for changes

Review states a maximum of 22 hours for youth, aged 12 from to 17, to be placed in solitary

Grace (left), a caribou that was born in a maternal pen north of Revelstoke, is alive and well said the province. It appears she even has a calf. Maternity pens aim to increase caribou calf survival by protecting them from predation until they are older and less vulnerable. (Contributed)
For the first time in years, caribou numbers increasing near Revelstoke

North herd growing but south herd still concerning

Most Read