Premier John Horgan leaves the podium following his first press conference of the year as he comments on various questions from the media in the Press Gallery at B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, January 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Premier John Horgan leaves the podium following his first press conference of the year as he comments on various questions from the media in the Press Gallery at B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, January 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

B.C. VIEWS: Few clouds on Horgan’s horizon

Horgan’s biggest challenge in the remainder of his term will be to keep the economy humming along

Premier John Horgan is well into his third year of governing. He must occasionally pinch himself, finding it hard to believe that his minority government is still in power.

Horgan is a realist. He has said on a number of occasions recently that the minority NDP government, propped up by three Green MLAs, is not counting on a full term. The next election is scheduled for Oct. 16, 2021.

The most likely challenge comes from former Green Party leader Andrew Weaver. Without his signature on a confidence and supply agreement, Horgan would not be premier.

Weaver has resigned as Green Party leader and has left the party’s caucus to sit as an independent. This is not due to a disagreement with the party. It is primarily an issue of principle. He has said he remains bound by the agreement. The only way his new status becomes a challenge is if he resigns his seat. There have been rumours that he could give up his Oak Bay-Gordon Head seat to return to teaching at the University of Victoria. Some suggest he will wait until the Green Party elects a new leader, and if that leader is not Cowichan Valley MLA Sonia Furstenau, he or she will need a seat. Adam Olsen, the other Green MLA, is serving as interim leader and isn’t running for the permanent position.

It’s interesting speculation, but Weaver is his own master and plays the game of politics quite differently.

There is little likelihood of any NDP MLA stepping down. Surrey Panorama MLA Jinny Sims has left the cabinet and is under investigation, but it seems unlikely that will lead to her resignation as an MLA. If there was a byelection, it would likely be a close vote. The BC Liberals held the seat almost continuously from 2001, except for a brief period when Jagrup Brar (now MLA for Surrey-Fleetwood) won it in a 2004 byelection and again in the 2005 election.

Horgan’s biggest challenge in the remainder of his term will be to keep the economy humming along. There are plenty of positive signs, but government revenues are slipping and the forestry crisis isn’t getting any better.

Another challenge is continuing to advance the reconciliation agenda. The present challenge to construction of a natural gas pipeline to feed a Kitimat LNG plant is a stark reminder that not all First Nations groups feel warm and fuzzy about the B.C. government.

A third major challenge are the twin issues of ICBC and ride-sharing. Both of these are high on the radar screen in urban areas. Without movement to make ICBC rates more affordable and ride-sharing actually available, the NDP will lose votes.

Leadership on these two issues by Attorney-General David Eby (ICBC) and Transportation Minister Claire Trevina (ride-sharing) has been uninspiring. There have been colourful comments, but no concrete action in actually making life more affordable for drivers and offering more rides to people without cars.

The premier’s biggest asset is himself. He is a friendly, likeable guy – at ease with ordinary people and comfortable in his own skin. He comes across well. Most B.C. residents, even if they did not vote for him, like his approach to the job.

This asset may come in very handy between now and whenever the next election takes place.

READ MORE: B.C. forest industry grasps for hope amid seven-month strike, shutdowns, changes

READ MORE: Disrespectful that Horgan won’t meet during northern B.C. tour, hereditary chief says

Frank Bucholtz is a columnist and former editor with Black Press Media. Email him at frank.bucholtz@blackpress.ca.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

A cougar, or cougars, went on a killing rampage at a small Fruitvale farm. Photo: Thomas S. on Unsplash
Cougar euthanized after taking out small animal farm in Fruitvale

Wildlife interactions, poachers or polluters should be reported to RAPP at 1.877.952.7277

Daryl Jolly, his wife Kerry Pagdin, their sons Cole Jolly (left) and Graeme Jolly, and their dogs Gracie and Clover. Photo: Submitted
Selkirk College arts chair diagnosed with lung cancer, family launches fund drive

Daryl Jolly co-founded the college’s digital arts program

TELUS is proposing to construct a 5G tower at Pople Park. Photo: Sheri Regnier
First 5G tower in Trail proposed for placement in popular park

TELUS has a consultation process open until June 28

The Kootenay International Junior Hockey League met for their AGM and announced a number of new initiatives, new awards and changes in their executive committee, as well as the starting date for the 2021-22 season. Paul Rodgers file.
KIJHL announces start dates for 2021-22 season

Season set to begin Oct. 1 with league still following all health guidelines

The border crossing on Highway 11 in Abbotsford heading south (file)
VIDEO: Western premiers call for clarity, timelines on international travel, reopening rules

Trudeau has called Thursday meeting, premiers say they expect to leave that meeting with a plan

St. Joseph's Mission site is located about six kilometres from Williams Lake First Nation. (Photo submitted)
Williams Lake First Nation to search residential school site for unmarked graves

St. Joseph’s Mission Indian Residential School operated from 1886 to 1981

Tuesday’s Lotto Max draw went unclaimed. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Tuesday’s Lotto Max draw went unclaimed. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lotto Max jackpot goes unclaimed again

42 of the 64 Maxmillion prizes of $1 million were won, the majority were sold in Ontario

FILE - This July 6, 2017 file photo shows prescription drugs in a glass flask at the state crime lab in Taylorsville, Utah. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
Contaminants in generic drugs may cause long-term harm to DNA: B.C. researcher

Scientist says findings suggest high volume overseas facilities require strict regulation

Restaurant patrons enjoy the weather on a patio in Vancouver, B.C., on April 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Labour shortages, closed borders major obstacles to B.C. restaurant, tourism restarts

Industry expert says it won’t start to recover until international travellers can visit

(Black Press Media file)
Dirty money: Canadian currency the most germ-filled in the world, survey suggests

Canadian plastic currency was found to contain 209 bacterial cultures

(pixabay file shot)
B.C. ombudsperson labels youth confinement in jail ‘unsafe,’ calls for changes

Review states a maximum of 22 hours for youth, aged 12 from to 17, to be placed in solitary

Grace (left), a caribou that was born in a maternal pen north of Revelstoke, is alive and well said the province. It appears she even has a calf. Maternity pens aim to increase caribou calf survival by protecting them from predation until they are older and less vulnerable. (Contributed)
For the first time in years, caribou numbers increasing near Revelstoke

North herd growing but south herd still concerning

Most Read