Village given permission to use pesticides

The only time the pesticides will only be used as a last resort when getting rid of invasive plant species.

Nakusp has a new weapon when it comes to battling invasive species in the area: pesticides.

Village crew won’t be using them for cosmetic purposes. Instead, it will be a last resort if the invasive species can’t be dealt with otherwise.

“There are two things you have to have in order to apply pesticides in a municipality,” said Terry Welsh, director of recreation and parks for the village of Nakusp. “You have to have licensed applicators, and you also have to have a pesticide license, which is granted by provincial authority.”

The last recorded instance for a pesticide license on file in Nakusp was back in 2005. The reason the village has been able to get the new license is because a member of staff undertook their certification in pesticide application.

The type of pesticide used will be RoundUp, and the active ingredient is glyphosate. It’s a systemic herbicide that prevents the plants from making certain proteins that are needed for plant growth.

RoundUp takes a period of 10-14 days to act.

The village is currently dealing with one type of invasive species with this method, Japanese knotweed. There is a patch of knotweed across from the village office and in other areas of town.

“Within the Weed Act in BC there are a number of invasive species that are of concern in the area, and so we would use herbicides, where appropriate, for control of those plants.” said Welsh.

Another invasive plant around the village is Scotch Broom. The village is using mechanical control to help deal with that plant, which means the plant is physically removed.

If the RoundUp doesn’t work, the village will use a three way application for plant control. In this case, it would be the commercial grade version of Weed-X.

The village hopes to use the pesticides as little as possible.

 

Just Posted

Ici repose: The Hamel family of Comaplix

The story of two children’s gravemarkers in an isolated Upper Arrow Lake cemetery

Deadline set for museum tax vote

Voters have until Aug. 13 to decide if Nakusp’s museum gets extra funding

Wanted: fish guts

Biologists are asking Arrow Lakes anglers for the insides of their fish.

The Supper Club serves it up every Thursday

Nakusp youth get comfortable in the kitchen

Trudeau asks transport minister to tackle Greyhound’s western pullout

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he’s asked Transport Minister Marc Garneau to find solutions in Greyhound Canada’s absence.

Restaurant Brands International to review policy over poaching employees

One of Canada’s largest fast-food company to review ‘no-poach’ franchise agreements

Calgary family’s vacation ends in tragedy on Texas highway

Three people died and four others were injured in the crash

Union construction cost competitive, B.C. Building Trades say

Non-union firms can bid on infrastructure, but employees have to join international unions

Trudeau to shuffle cabinet ahead of Liberals’ team for 2019

Trudeau could lighten the work loads of cabinet ministers who currently oversee more than one portfolio

Car calls 911 on possible impaired B.C. driver

A luxury car automatically calls Princeton police to scene of crash involving alcohol

BC Games marks 40 years in 2018

Cowichan Games a milestone for BC Games Society

VIDEO: Life’s a beach at this B.C. sand sculpting contest

More than $50,000 was up for grabs at the annual contest held in Parksville

Group urges Canada to help Holocaust denier on trial in Germany

They’re concerned about Canada’s apparent unwillingness to come to the aid of Monika Schaefer

Most Read