Down pillows on a bed. Not the down pillows in civil dispute between B.C. couple. (Pixabay photo)

Two pillows, ‘Magic Wand’ vibrator at centre of B.C. civil dispute between exes

Whether the items were gifted under Canadian law or not main argument in Civil Resolution Tribunal case

The bitter end of a relationship between a B.C. man and his ex-girlfriend was spotlighted in a recent small claims dispute, as the man attempted to get back his two down pillows and a cordless vibrator.

On Monday, Civil Resolution Tribunal Member Trisha Apland released her decision on a dispute between a B.C. man and his ex-girlfriend, which centred on whether a Hitachi Magic Wand and two pillows valuing a total of $300 counted as gifts under Canadian laws.

In order to be considered a legally binding gift, the item must meet three requirements: that there was an intent to donate it by the giver, it was accepted by the recipient, and it was clearly delivered either by the person or through other means. It’s up to the recipient of the item to prove it was a gift.

Under Canadian law, gifts don’t need to be returned.

According to the decision, the man said he stayed every other weekend at the ex-girlfriend’s house.

During their relationship, he bought the two down pillows to sleep on because he couldn’t use her synthetic ones, leaving them at her home in between visits.

ALSO READ: Judge divvies up illegal estate of divorcing B.C. couple

The former girlfriend argued to the tribunal that she thought the pillows were gifted to her, because the man allowed her to use one of the pillows.

But Apland determined this wasn’t enough evidence to prove the soft pillows were gifts, ordering the woman to return them to her ex-boyfriend.

The Magic Wand was no different, the tribunal decision shows.

According to text and voice messages exchanged between the pair, the Magic Wand was purchased by the man and delivered to his then-girlfriend’s home but was intended to be used for the former couple’s mutual enjoyment, often referred to as “his” sex toy.

But she claimed that she just pretended the vibrator was not hers because she felt “weird” about gifts, and that it is meant to be for female use so she should get to keep it.

The tribunal disagreed.

“The evidence does not establish that the Magic Wand is a gender-specific item,” Apland wrote.

In some decisions, the tribunal will order compensation for the items in question. However, the woman was ordered to send the pillows and vibrator via registered mail back to her ex within the next 30 days, and will also have to pay Pederson’s tribunal fees, or roughly $125.

She has 28 days from Monday to appeal the decision.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Black Press Media has removed the names of both parties due to privacy concerns.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Hwy 1 flooding causes massive delays on certain Arrow Lakes ferry routes

Motorists have been waiting around three hours to get on ferries

RDCK: spring flooding financial relief available

The provincial funds are for those affected by flooding in May and early June

Nakusp celebrates Canada Day with parade

Around 50 people from various business and organizations participated in parade

QUIZ: Put your knowledge of Canada to the test

How much do you know about our country?

Selkirk College offering employees voluntary resignations

The college is canvassing employees for those who may want some time off or reduced work loads

B.C. accommodators need phone lines to light up as in-province travel given green light

Travel restrictions during the COVID-19 pandemic have decimated the tourism and hospitality industries

300 Cache Creek residents on evacuation alert due to flood risk as river rises

Heavy rainfall on Canada Day has river rising steadily, threatening 175 properties

First glimpse of Canada’s true COVID-19 infection rate expected mid-July

At least 105,000 Canadians have tested positive for COVID-19 since the coronavirus was identified

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Most Read