Jett Larsen earned his high school diploma a year early, while managing to pull off top grades. Photo Credit Andrea DeMeer

Top small-town B.C. grad headed to university at 16 years old

“If your dreams don’t scare you, they are not big enough.”

The top student graduating from Princeton Secondary School Saturday was also the youngest person on the stage.

In fact, when he heads to the University of Calgary this September to study business, Jett Larsen will be only 16-years-old.

Larsen decided about 18 months ago he wanted to graduate a year early, so he upped his game with course selection and completed several credits over the summer.

“I wanted to kind of just get out and be in the world, I guess,” he told The Spotlight. “I wanted to go and explore new things and create new experiences.”

Larsen said the idea of attending school in another province at such a tender age is a bit daunting.

“Yeah, for sure. It’s one of those things, obviously. It’s a bit frightening, but I think that anything that is good is a little bit frightening,” he said. “If your dreams don’t scare you, they are not big enough.”

Larsen won the Princeton District Teachers’ Union scholarship of $2,000 for the highest Grade Point Average in Grades 11 and 12.

He also received a $2,000 entrance scholarship for the University of Calgary, a $1,250 Dogwood District Award for athletics, the $300 Princeton Posse Stan Turner Memorial Award, a $300 Fun Fair Bursary and the Harris and Company Law award of $400.

Larsen plans to attend law school after he earns a business degree and hopes to be a corporate lawyer.

“That’s the plan. ..I really like the game of law and business, the having to put in the work in order to succeed and having to have a strategy and having to understand all of the different aspects of strategy.”

He did his work experience at Avery Law Office, and his law teacher Chris Sowden remarked that Larsen entered the class “knowing more about the law that I do.”

Larsen’s parents were key to his achievements.

“They are very supportive. They knew it was something I wanted to do and they were going to help me any way they could.”

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andrea.demeer@similkameenspotlight.com

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