Students in the Outdoor Education class at Nakusp Secondary School practice their search and rescue skills during a survival weekend at MacDonald Creek Park. The students spent three days and two nights in the outdoors

Survivor: Nakusp edition

Students in the Outdoor Education class at Nakusp Secondary School took part in a survival weekend at MacDonald Creek Park.

Living in a remote area such as Nakusp, many of the activities residents do involve the outdoors, including walking, hiking, mountain biking, and more.

Because of this fact, survival skills are an important thing to have, something the Outdoor Education class learned this past weekend at MacDonald Creek Park.

The students spent three days and two nights in the outdoors, learning how to use a compass and map, GPS, cook a meal, and build a shelter.

“It really teaches you a lot of skills that you actually learn to survive outside if you do get stuck,” said Ivy Tourand, one of the students. “There is such a high chance that you’re going to get lost around here.”

Along with learning these skills, the students also practised search and rescue.

On Sunday, the students took part in a search and rescue activity. Members of the group would be out in the forest, only for one of them to break their ankle. Search and rescue team members would come, and they, along with three students who remained at the camp site would then track them to their location, all the while carrying a stretcher.

Once the group was found, they were taught what look for in terms of potential injuries, and how to properly load them onto the stretcher. The students then took turns in creating a trail, carrying the stretcher, and being the rescuee in the stretcher.

After getting back to the camp site, Gordon Hogaboam, a member of the local search and rescue crew, went over the exercise, talking about what the students did right, and what they could improve upon.

While the weekend proved to be a challenge for the students, it was also enjoyable.

“It’s kind of fun,” said student Renee Goodman. “You get what you bring, and if you didn’t bring it, you have to figure it out.”

 

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