A scaled-down Remembrance Day will take place outside the Nakusp Cenotaph at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11 to honour all of the Nakusp veterans who fought in past wars. Those planning to attend the service are reminded to physically distance and gather in small groups to mitigate the COVID-19 risk. (File photo)

A scaled-down Remembrance Day will take place outside the Nakusp Cenotaph at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11 to honour all of the Nakusp veterans who fought in past wars. Those planning to attend the service are reminded to physically distance and gather in small groups to mitigate the COVID-19 risk. (File photo)

Small ceremony only for Remembrance Day in Nakusp again this year

Legion reminds to wear poppy in remembrance

The Royal Canadian Legion in Nakusp will once again only host a small Remembrance Day service at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, there will be no service in the hall or parade to the cenotaph. Wreaths will be laid prior to the service.

While the Legion lounge will be open to a maximum of 50 people, there will be no luncheon.

Poppy donation trays will be available at the Legion Lounge and businesses around Nakusp.

This year is the 100th anniversary of the poppy being adopted as a symbol of remembrance.

Anna Guerin, of France, is credited with having first proposed the poppy as a symbol of the horrible costs and sacrifices of war in the aftermath of the First World War.

Guerin drew inspiration from In Flanders Fields, the moving poem written during the war by lieutenant-colonel John McCrae and which continues to be read at Remembrance Day ceremonies across Canada and other parts of the world each year.

READ MORE: Legion marks 100th anniversary of poppy symbol during campaign launch

The Great War Veterans’ Association of Canada officially adopted the poppy symbol in 1921, and the iconic flower has been worn in the weeks leading up to the annual ceremony ever since. Donations collected during the fundraising campaign are used to support various Legion programs for veterans, including:

•training and research

•medical appliances to assist the care of veterans

•services through Canadian Military Family Resource Centres

•housing and care facilities for elderly, disabled and homeless veterans

•bursaries for children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren of veterans

•veteran drop-in centres and meals-on-wheels programs

•sponsorship of cadet and youth programs

The Legion asks everyone to wear a poppy in remembrance.

–With files by The Canadian Press

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