B.C. has large forest areas damaged by wildfires and beetle infestation that do not have a reforestation plan.

Reforestation plan needed, experts say

One million hectares of B.C. forest land may need to be replanted to help them recover from widespread fire and bark beetle problems.

One million hectares of B.C. forest land may need to be replanted to help them recover from widespread fire and bark beetle problems, according to a new report from the B.C. government’s Forest Practices Board.

The report estimates the entire area that may need replanting at two million hectares, out of the 95 million hectares of total forest land in B.C. But about 500,000 hectares of that is the legal responsibility of the forest companies that logged it, and the government has plans in place to replant another 250,000 hectares.

“Decisions about whether to replant areas where mountain pine beetle and fires have killed most of the trees will have an impact on the future timber supply,” board chair Al Gorley said. “At a minimum, if nature is left to take its course, the eventual crop of timber in those areas will be delayed.”

The board, an independent watchdog of the B.C. government, is critical of the way the government defines “not satisfactorily restocked” forest land. The definition only applies to areas designated for timber harvest.

Even within this 22 million-hectare timber supply area, there are large areas affected by fire or pests, but the report notes that the ministry’s survey data on these areas are not sufficient to be certain of their tree survival or recovery.

“There has been only a limited amount of reforestation effort directed at mature beetle-affected forests because those areas might still be harvested by the forest industry,” the report says.

The ministry announced regulatory changes Tuesday to promote salvage of wood waste for producing wood pellets and other “bio-products,” including electricity, fuels, plastics, solvents, lubricants and food additives.

The regulations are aimed at providing access to smaller trees, tops and branches that are piled at logging sites and roads when sawlogs are taken out. They authorize new salvage licences that do not allow the harvest of standing trees.


Just Posted

Speakers to discuss Site C project- and how to stop it

Finding parallels between massive northern hydro project and the Arrow Lakes flooding

Consult before creating Fauquier reserve: CCT

Sinixt seek consultation before Westbank reserve gets go-ahead

In historic Sandon, clearing roofs just part of winter

Sandon roofs can take a lot, but need maintenance

Needles killer frightened many in our town: BC author

Roy Bugera disrupted life in a quiet Vancouver Island village before moving to Arrow Lakes

Nakusp vets leaving after 30 years

Practice has been sold and new owners will take over in a month

VIDEO: B.C. Mounties reunite veteran with lost military medals

RCMP say Zora Singh Tatla, who served in the army in India for 28 years, is the righful owner

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

4 facts to ring in St. Patrick’s Day

What do you really know about the Irish celebration?

Experts urging caution as rabbits die by the hundreds in B.C. city

Province of B.C. confirms more positive tests for rabbit haemorrhagic disease

Federal government seeks public feedback on pedestrian safety

What safety measures do you think need to improved for pedestrians and cyclists?

Search continues for 10-year-old Montreal boy missing since Monday

Montreal police said they are exploring every possibility in search for Ariel Jeffrey Kouakou

Airline passenger-rights bill claws back protections for travellers: Advocate

Bill C-49 would double tarmac delays, scrap compensation for flights affected by mechanical failures

Canadian research vessel to explore 19th Century shipwrecks

Commissioned this week in Victoria, the RV David Thompson is Parks Canada’s newest vessel

VIDEO: ‘New wave’ of anti-pipeline protests return to Trans Mountain facility

About 100 demonstrators with Protect the Inlet marched to the Burnaby terminal Saturday

Most Read