Members of various organizations in town salute to honour the fallen at the cenotaph at Rotary Park on Remembrance Day. Though the weather was a bit chilly

Members of various organizations in town salute to honour the fallen at the cenotaph at Rotary Park on Remembrance Day. Though the weather was a bit chilly

Nakusp remembers its fallen

Crowds gathered at the cenotaph in Rotary Park to mark Remembrance Day in the village.

On a slightly chilly Nov. 11 morning, residents of Nakusp and surrounding areas came to the village to honour and remember those soldiers who paid the ultimate price while serving their country in times of war.

Starting things off was the service at the hall of the Royal Canadian Legion. So many people attended the ceremony some actually had to stand because all the seats were taken.

After the singing of “Oh Canada” and a welcome from past president Harvey Truax, prayers were said by Chaplain Dan Freeman, and the community choir sang “Thank You Soldiers.”

Sisters Maia and Zoe Zinselmeyer, along with Carmen Larder read their junior, intermediate, and senior essays of honour and remembrance.

Following the service, Legion members marched up Broadway Street for the ceremony at the cenotaph.

Some Legion members were unable to march to the park, so they waited with the rest of the crowd until they could join back up with their crew to lay the wreaths.

One of those laying a wreath was Cheryl Truax, the acting president of the Nakusp Royal Canadian Legion.

Truax was standing in for Steve Tays, the Legion’s current president.

This was the first time she had laid a wreath on behalf of the Legion, and while she was nervous, she was glad she was able to do it.

“I was honoured, because I love the poppy campaign, and the veterans are my world,” she said. “They’ve done a lot for me, so that’s what I do.”

Though Nakusp has a small population, many residents came out to the cenotaph for the ceremony, something not uncommon for the village. Though weather can affect the number of people who show up, Truax thinks the reason so many people come is to say thank you.

“They’ve given their lives for us, for peace, and what we’ve got today,” she said. “I wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for them, that’s the way I look at it.”