To learn more about Living Lakes Canada’s groundwater monitoring program in the Columbia Basin, visit livinglakescanada.ca/projects/groundwater. Photo submitted

Group seeks volunteer testers in Basin for groundwater monitoring

Testing allows for better management of water resources, says Living Lakes

A water quality conservation group is looking to expand its well water testing in the Columbia Basin.

Living Lakes Canada manages the Columbia Basin groundwater monitoring program, which works with citizens, local governments and other stakeholders throughout the Basin to collect groundwater data that otherwise would not be collected.

The information can then be used by citizens to learn about groundwater and in-water management decisions, climate adaptation planning, and conservation planning to ensure sustainable water supplies for human use and to maintain healthy ecosystems.

SEE: Living Lakes Groundwater monitoring program

The program is looking to expand the number of wells it is monitoring and invites interested well owners (domestic and non-domestic) to contact program manager Carol Luttmer at groundwater@livinglakescanada.ca.

Note, however, that suitable wells for monitoring are typically not actively used to withdraw water.

Columbia Basin businesses and landowners who use groundwater for non-domestic purposes are reminded they are legally required to apply for a water licence.

This change came into effect in 2016 with the new Water Sustainability Act. Four years later, just 15 per cent of B.C. users have complied, according to a recent article published by the Partnership for Water Sustainability.

Licensing is needed to protect many of the regions in B.C. that have reached a point where water supply is reaching critically low levels, and prevent the same water stress from happening elsewhere in the province, state the authors. Domestic groundwater users are exempt from licensing but are encouraged to register their well so it can be added to the provincial database.

“Groundwater helps maintain water levels and water quality in wetlands, streams, rivers and lakes,” says Living Lakes Canada executive director Kat Hartwig. “It’s important to manage this freshwater resource for the health of communities and ecosystems, especially in a changing climate.”

To better understand the new requirements for groundwater users, to apply for a licence or to register your well, visit the BC Government website at https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/environment/air-land-water/water/water-licensing-rights/water-licences-approvals/new-requirements-for-groundwater-users.

Living Lakes Canada works to foster citizen-based water stewardship. It says its mandate is “to help Canadians understand the intimate connections between water quantity, water quality, land-use, climate change, biodiversity, and healthy human communities by building a water stewardship ethic that all Canadians can be proud of.”

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