Extinction Rebellion, shown here at a past protest, will be holding a “funeral procession” in Vancouver on Friday, Nov. 29, 2019. (Extinction Rebellion/Facebook)

Environmental group to host ‘Funeral for Extinction’ march in Vancouver on Black Friday

Climate strike event to be held on the same day

A group of environmental activists are hosting a funeral-themed procession in Vancouver on Black Friday.

The event, dubbed “Funeral for Extinction” will be hosted by Extinction Rebellion, the group that blocked access to bridges across Canada on Oct. 7 in an attempt to spur more climate change action from the federal government.

VIDEO: Climate demonstrators shut down Canadian bridges as part of global action

According to the Facebook page for the event, it’s meant to symbolize that if nothing is done, the climate crisis will get worse and lead to droughts, floods and starvation.

It is being held on Black Friday to bring attention to how corporations encourage the purchase of “unnecessary” goods.

Participants are asked to wear black funeral attire and be as “theatrical” as possible, such as wearing face veils, top hats and suits.

The procession will start at 1 p.m. in Art Phillips Park, near Burrard Station, wind through the downtown streets, and arrive at Robson Street and Thurlow Avenue for a clothing swap, seed trade, and clothes-mending workshop.

It’s taking place the same day as a climate strike hosted by Sustainabiliteens Vancouver. The group, which has hosted previous climate strikes in Vancouver, has dubbed this week’s event “Futurefest.”

The afternoon will culminate in a climate rally at Vancouver City Centre Station until 3 p.m.

Unlike previous strikes, this one will not have a march component, but a welcome dance, flash mob, clothing drive, and open mic.

The group said the event is mean to prove that “sustainability shouldn’t have to be a luxury product.”

READ MORE: Thousands join Greta Thunberg for climate strike in Vancouver


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

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