Gary Kenneth Bob, the man responsible for Rascal, a terrier surrendered to the B.C. SPCA with severe flea infestation in 2017, pictured here, gave a $750 donation to the SPCA prior to his sentencing on Oct. 30 at provincial court in Nanaimo. (Submitted photo)

B.C. man banned from owning dogs for 5 years after flea-infested Rascal nearly died

Man who was caring for dog infested with 100,000 fleas sentenced in Nanaimo

A man caring for a dog that nearly died from blood loss due to severe flea infestation has pleaded guilty and been fined and banned from owning animals for five years.

Gary Kenneth Bob, 60, was charged in July 2017 under the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act with causing an animal to continue to be in distress, after Rascal, a terrier under his care, was surrendered to the B.C. SPCA in critical condition. The dog was said to have more than 100,000 fleas on him and lost close to 85 per cent of his blood, subsequently receiving vitamin and iron injections, a blood transfusion and flea treatment medication from a veterinarian.

Basil McCormick, Crown counsel, and Chris Churchill, defence counsel, agreed on a joint submission, with Bob pleading guilty. He was fined $250 and given the five-year prohibition from having custody or control over an animal by Judge Parker MacCarthy in provincial court in Nanaimo Oct. 30.

Churchill said Bob was sorry for neglecting Rascal and prior to sentencing, had donated $750 to the local SPCA, despite having limited financial means.

Rascal, whose owner was in an on-again, off-again relationship with Bob, had left the terrier in his care. Bob said he was unable to care for the animal because he would be leaving on the Tribal Journeys trip and turned Rascal over to an animal advocacy group, which took the dog to the SPCA.

RELATED: Dog with 100,000 fleas saved after blood transfusion

RELATED: Nanaimo dogs recognized for blood and bravery

During sentencing, Churchill said the action was “out of character” for Bob, who has no criminal record and is a respected member of Snaw-Naw-As First Nation. Letters supporting Bob were submitted to the court.

Churchill said Bob has worked in construction and was injured at the time of the event. His medical employment insurance had run out and the electricity had been shut off to his house.

When addressing the court, Bob thanked Churchill for his assistance and said he now realizes what the laws are and has learned from the incident.



reporter@nanaimobulletin.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Paramedics union raises alarm over spike in out-of-service ambulances

Staffing shortages affecting service levels in Kootenays

Update: Car located in Pend d’Oreille River, teenagers remain missing

A fundraiser has been set up at Kootenay Savings in Fruitvale to help support the family

Two missing in Pend d’Oreille crash

A 15-year-old male and 18-year-old female both from Fruitvale are missing and presumed deceased

Judge: Nelson not liable for snowbank injury

A woman sued the city after injuring herself in 2015

Kalesnikoff announces $35 million South Slocan facility

Mass timber manufacturing facility will create 50 full-time, technology-centered jobs.

VIDEO: Can you believe it? This B.C. hill pulls cars backwards up a slope

Sir Isaac Newton had clearly never been to this Vernon anomaly when he discovered gravity

Canucks hang on for 7-4 win over Senators

Horvat nets 2 for Vancouver

European, Canadian regulators to do own review of Boeing jet

Air Canada plans to remove the Boeing 737 Max from its schedule at least through July 1

Prime minister defends Liberal budget measures as sales effort gets underway

Conservatives under Andrew Scheer say it’s a spree funded by borrowing against the future

Mayor meets with B.C. health minister on homeless taxi transfers

Two homeless people were discharged from Surrey Memorial and sent to a Chilliwack shelter

B.C. lottery winner being sued by co-workers

They claim he owes them $200,000 each, in a lawsuit filed in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver

Teacher reprimanded for conduct towards special needs student

Alan Stephen Berry told vice principal he did not have time to use positive strategies

‘Full worm super moon’ to illuminate B.C. skies on first day of spring

Spring has sprung, a moon named in honour of thawing soil marks final super moon until 2020

Having phone within sight while driving does not violate law: B.C. judge

The mere presence of a cell phone within sight of a driver is not enough for a conviction, judge says

Most Read