Comedian Garrett Clark has won a judgment through the Civil Resolution Tribunal for an incident in Abbotsford last summer that involved his cellphone being broken.

B.C. comic wins judgment after club owner slaps cellphone out of his hands

Incident happened last summer when Garrett Clark was performing in Abbotsford

A comedian whose cellphone was slapped out of his hand by an Abbotsford comedy club owner last summer has won a small-claims judgment.

Garrett Clark had sought $1,000 for his broken iPhone 6 but was awarded $400 by the Civil Resolution Tribunal (CRT) on Thursday.

CRT documents indicate that Clark was slated to perform on Aug. 9 and 10, along with two other comedians.

The documents do not name the comedy club, but an online search shows that Clark performed at Yuk Yuk’s in Abbotsford on those dates.

Normally, each comedian has a complimentary room at the hotel connected to the club, but when Clark arrived on Aug. 9, there were only two rooms available, the documents state.

Clark called his agent to ask about a third room, but his agent was unable to reach anyone.

The documents state that Clark then asked club owner Sarbjit Dosanjh if there was somewhere he could change before the show.

ALSO READ: Jerry Seinfeld and others talk about the worst times they bombed on stage

“He says the dialogue became frustrated. Using his iPhone, the applicant took a photo of the respondent so he could show his agent who was causing him ‘grief’ … He says the respondent said not to take photos of him,” they state.

Clark said Dosanjh then slapped Clark’s hands, causing the cellphone to go flying onto the stairs.

The phone could then no longer be unlocked, and the screen was obscured, according to the documents.

Clark used a friend’s cellphone to call police, but officers said they could not do anything because it was a civil matter and nobody was injured.

One of the other comedians who was scheduled to perform that night testified that they saw the entire exchange.

But Dosanjh denied slapping Clark’s phone, and said that Clark should not be believed because “he failed to bring his broken phone to management’s attention and the applicant performed the scheduled two nights in the club.”

Clark said he needed to perform both shows in order to be paid for the weekend.

Tribunal member Micah Carmody said he believed Clark over Dosanjh.

“I find it unlikely that the applicant would contact the police if his iPhone was not broken,” Carmody wrote in his decision.

Carmody said, because of the age of the phone and its unknown prior condition, he valued it at less than the $1,100 sought by Clark.


 

@VikkiHopes
vhopes@abbynews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Law & Justice

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Interior Health will not expand Police and Crisis Team

Southeast Division Chief Superintendent Brad Haugli asked IH to expand the program

Hwy 1 flooding causes massive delays on certain Arrow Lakes ferry routes

Motorists have been waiting around three hours to get on ferries

RDCK: spring flooding financial relief available

The provincial funds are for those affected by flooding in May and early June

Nakusp celebrates Canada Day with parade

Around 50 people from various business and organizations participated in parade

QUIZ: Put your knowledge of Canada to the test

How much do you know about our country?

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Liberal party finished 2019 having spent $43 million, raised $42 million

All political parties had until midnight June 30 to submit their financial reports for last year

B.C. teacher loses licence after sexual relationships with two recently-graduated students

The teacher won’t be allowed to apply for a teaching certificate until 2035

White-throated sparrows have changed their tune, B.C. study unveils

Study marks an unprecedented development scientists say has caused them to sit up and take note

Alberta health minister orders review into response after noose found in hospital in 2016

A piece of rope tied into a noose was found taped to the door of an operating room at the Grande Prairie Hospital in 2016

B.C.’s major rivers surge, sparking flood warnings

A persistent low pressure system over Alberta has led to several days of heavy rain

Most Read