August 2015

Highlights from the month of August for the Arrow Lakes News Year in Review

Armoured youth do battle with weapons made of rattan

Nakusp cougar threat neutralized by conservation officer

Social media has been buzzing as members of the Nakusp community posted sightings and warnings of a cougar in town.

The neighbourhood watch method of information sharing helped keep residents safe as the aggressive cougar preyed on local cats, dogs, and livestock.

Tobe Sprado, a conservation officer based out of Castlegar, also encouraged the public to call the Report a Poacher Polluter (RAPP) call centre to report any human/wildlife conflict situations they might find themselves in.

On Aug. 1, RAPP received a report of two slaughtered lambs in a rural area just south of the village of Nakusp. Sprado arrived on site later that day. Using one of the lamb carcasses as bait, a foot hold trap was set to catch the cougar. Sprado reported a large, adult female cougar was caught in the trap. It was euthanized and removed from the area.

The great barrier grief

Residents of Nakusp were surprised to discover concrete barriers across sections of a wrap around trail in the village.

The barriers were put up because the village received of a number of complaints involving motorized vehicles on the trail, including two near miss incidents involving children.

“I understand that we didn’t give much notice,” said Karen Hamling, mayor of Nakusp. “But when it is a safety issue like that, and the situation is escalating, we had to do something.”

There are two bylaws in the village books which prohibit motorized vehicles on the trail, though they haven’t been enforced until now.

Groups opposed to the barriers have been outspoken on the issue, and a petition was created to amend the bylaw.

Nakusp goes Medieval

Nakusp got a taste of the medieval as more than 325 members of the Society of Creative Anachronism (SCA) set up camp outside the village for the first annual Medieval Festival.

The event took place over the span of two days, and featured many hands-on opportunities for festival goers who were interested in in the learning experiences.

With the exception of the rare isolated demonstration, most SCA events are closed to the public. This is the first time the group has partnered with a local society, the Nakusp Medieval Society, and the first event open to the public.

Reception to the festival has been very positive, and talks of a follow-up event have already begun.

“The SCA wants to come back in much larger numbers, but I think that is a lot of planning,” said Daniel Abraham, a member of the Nakusp Medieval Society. “I am looking forward to it, but it is a little bit intimidating. I think it is going to be much bigger and better next year.”

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