CBT to continue School Works Program this fall

A CBT program that helped get Nakusp student Marina Cunningham working at the Nakusp library will be run again next year.

A CBT program that helped get Nakusp student Marina Cunningham working at the Nakusp library will be run again next year.

The School Works Program pilot, which began its successful run in February, is being offered again this fall to Basin-based businesses and organizations.

School Works provides an $8/hour wage subsidy to encourage small businesses and non-profit, First Nation and public sector organizations in the Basin to provide part-time employment for full-time high school and post-secondary students in the Basin during the school year.

“CBT is pleased to be able to continue the School Works Program this fall,” said Sabrina Curtis, CBT Director, Planning and Development. “We are providing $600,000 toward wage subsidies for Basin organizations to increase the availability of jobs for students.”

College of the Rockies delivered the pilot and will continue to work in partnership with CBT to administer the program this fall.

“We are excited to continue collaborating with CBT after a very successful first run. The School Works Program has had such a positive impact on businesses throughout the Columbia Basin; we are thrilled to be a part of it,” Tracey Whiting, Manager of Contract Training and Business Development at College of the Rockies.

From January to June, 64 businesses throughout the Basin hired students part-time with the support of the School Works Program.

In Nakusp, Marina Cunningham was hired through the program to work at the Nakusp Public Library.

“I had a chance to improve my people skills,” said Cunningham. “My job was very one-on-one with clients of the library and included being asked lots of questions. I’m going to study interior design after graduating grade 12, so having good people skills will be very important. I also increased my knowledge about books, gave reading recommendations, and practiced my writing skills through writing documentation on how to use eReaders.”

Cunningham wasn’t the only one to benefit from the program, which also helped the small library staff.

“Having Marina here was awesome. The people who Marina helped were so grateful. This is something we couldn’t have done without her, as other staff doesn’t always have the time,” said Sabina Iseli-Otto, librarian at the Nakusp Public Library.

The fall application intake for the School Works Program will begin on a first-come first-served basis on August 14. Check www.cbt.org/schoolworks for more information.

 

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