Orphaned bear cubs Seymour and River are staying at the Critter Care wildlife rehabilitation facility in Langley until they can be returned to the wild. Photo supplied

VIDEO: Cute bear cubs playing in pool

Orphaned brother and sister cared for at Critter Care facility

A video of two bear cubs splashing in a pool is generating a lot of positive feedback online after the Critter Care wildlife rehabilitation facility in Langley posted a clip of Seymour and River playing.

Thousands have viewed the online footage showing the pair having fun after they were recently moved into the large bear enclosure at the facility.

Critter Care Wildlife Society founder Gail Martin said the five- to six-month-old brother and sister were orphaned in May in North Vancouver.

“The mother was getting in trouble, getting into garbage,” Martin said.

Since they arrived, the cubs have gained weight and have begun to do playful “bear things” like the splashing and wrestling with each other, Martin said.

“They’re doing really well,” Martin said.

Plans call for the siblings to be reintroduced back into the wild after the spring bear hunt next year, following their hibernation, which is expected to last from December to March.

Langley’s Critter Care Wildlife Society will host its 19th annual open house next month

READ MORE: Critter Care annual open house set for July 21 and 22

The society, expects to see between 1,500 and 2,000 people come through the gate during the two-day open house, scheduled for July 21 and 22. The grounds will be open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day.

Admission is $5 for adults and free for children 12 and under. The price of admission includes the tour (the bear cubs will not be part of the tour).

In past years, the open house has raised close to $30,000 for the society over two days.

The money raised is used to buy medicine and specialized food, as well as vaccine for the raccoons.

READ MORE: Opossums deserve love too, says Critter Care founder

For 30 years, Critter Care Wildlife Society has specialized in the treatment, care and release of sick, injured and orphaned native mammal species in southern B.C. and the Lower Mainland.

The society cares for injured animals that are brought to them by citizens, including newborn animals that can require round-the-clock bottle feeding, going through more than 100 pounds of vegetables, fruits and meats a day.

It is the only facility in BC specializing in the care of mammals and one of only four bear rehabilitation facilities in the province.

READ MORE: Tiny bear cubs Romeo and Juliet saved from tragedy

In addition to rehabilitation the charity carries out community based education programs at primary, secondary, and collegiate levels.

Critter Care interns stay on site and come from around the world to gain experience with wildlife for training to become veterinarians or zoo keepers in their own countries.

Critter Care is closed to the public except during the open houses.



dan.ferguson@langleytimes.com

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