Max 8 grounding hitting Air Canada’s bottom line despite a strong quarter

Canada’s largest airline cancelled a total of 8,000 flights last quarter

Max 8 grounding hitting Air Canada’s bottom line despite a strong quarter

The Boeing 737 Max grounding continues to weigh on Air Canada’s bottom line, the company said Monday, despite topping expectations in its latest quarter.

“The impact on our unit cost is expected to increase the longer the grounding persists, particularly heading towards the busy summer season,” chief financial officer Michael Rousseau said.

He cited a reduction in seat capacity of between three per cent and four cent due to the grounding, which continues across the globe as the Max jetliner’s flight control system remains under scrutiny following two deadly crashes.

Less fuel-efficient replacement aircraft such as the Airbus A320, extended plane leases and contracting out of some flights will also eat into profits, Rousseau said on a conference call with investors.

READ MORE: Garneau calls for flight simulators before Max 8s can return to Canadian skies

Canada’s largest airline cancelled a total of 8,000 flights last quarter, 1,600 of which were on its higher-revenue mainline routes — a 40 per cent increase in mainline cancellations from the first quarter of 2018, chief executive Calin Rovinescu said.

“Overnight…literally…we removed these aircraft from the fleet. So we had 18 days where we were scrambling to actually take care of our customers,” he said, adding that harsh weather also played a role in the cancellations.

The airline’s 24 Max 8 jetliners represent about 20 per cent of its narrow-body fleet, typically carrying between 9,000 and 12,000 passengers per day. The planes’ sudden removal helped push adjusted cost per available seat mile (CASM), a key industry metric, up 3.2 per cent.

“On the cost side, there’s no doubt adjusted CASM is going to be influenced primarily by the reduction in ASMs — in seat miles,” Rousseau said.

The company’s financial guidance — which it suspended on March 15 two days after Transport Canada closed its skies to the Max — will remain frozen until Air Canada gets “greater clarity” on the aircraft, Rovinescu said.

The carrier will consider returning the Max to service after Transport Canada and other regulatory authorities, including the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, lift airspace bans and approve software modification and training protocols, he said.

Rovinescu acknowledged it would take at least several weeks after bans are lifted to return Max 8s to the rotation as maintenance crews prepare the planes for a staggered reintroduction.

Safety concerns continue to hang over the Max aircraft after Boeing said a safety alert sensor malfunctioned on an Ethiopian Airlines flight last March and a fatal Lion Air crash off the coast of Indonesia in October. The two flights, both on Max 8s, killed a total of 346 people, including 18 Canadians on board the Ethiopian Airlines flight.

Rovinescu declined to comment on speculation around Montreal-based tour operator Transat A.T., which confirmed last week it had spoken with several parties about a possible sale of the company.

Chief commercial officer Lucie Guillemette said Canada’s ongoing dispute with China stemming from the arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou last year has hurt travel demand between the two countries.

“However, reallocating capacity from China to other markets has helped mitigate the impact,” she said.

The company’s stock was up nearly five per cent in midday trading Monday, hitting $35.23.

Analyst Doug Taylor of Canaccord Genuity dubbed it “a great quarter given the conditions.”

The Montreal-based carrier said it earned $345 million or $1.26 per diluted share for its first quarter, compared with a loss of $203 million or 74 cents per diluted share in the same quarter a year ago.

Air Canada said the results included foreign exchange gains of $263 million in its most recent quarter compared with foreign exchange losses of $197 million in the first quarter of 2018.

On an adjusted basis, the airline said it earned $17 million or six cents per diluted share in the quarter compared with an adjusted loss of $26 million or 10 cents per diluted share a year ago.

Operating revenue rose to a first-quarter record of $4.45 billion compared with $4.07 billion in the first three months of 2018.

Analysts on average had expected an adjusted loss of 18 cents per share and revenue of nearly $4.39 billion for the quarter, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.

Christopher Reynolds, The Canadian Press

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