Team from Nakusp helps set new world record

Team members from Nakusp help set new world record for most seedlings planted in a single hour.

Volunteers from Nakusp and Castlegar helped set a new world record.

On May 20, the Sustainable Forest Initiative partnered with 29 teams from across Canada and the U.S. to create a new world record for the most seedlings planted in a single hour. In total, 202,935 trees were planted.

The Interfor team from Nakusp and Castlegar planted 8,227 of those trees.

“There were 34 planters, and they all had 300 seedlings in their bags, and they’re trained professional,” said team leader David Jackson. His team planted trees in an area just east of Whatshan Lake.

Jackson manages the silviculture department for Interfor out of Nakusp. He said SFI initiated it through their clients. As one such client, Interfor was asked to participate.

“We were happy to help out. It was a lot of fun.” he said.

While the Nakusp team planted a large amount, other teams planted numbers just as impressive.

“Irving had a team as well, and I think they planted 51,000 trees. They planted a lot of trees in one hour.” said Jackson.

Jackson said there are possible plans to do this again next year.

“We haven’t been asked to yet, but we’re certainly more than willing to participate in things that promote the good stewardship that we’re involved with here.” he said.

Interfor is contractually obligated to re-establish a stand of trees once harvest is over.

“We log a lot of trees, and we’re obligated to plant the trees back and get a new crop of trees growing in as short a time as possible,” said Jackson. “We like to promote that, and we think that’s what SFI did was to sort of help promote the planting and the environmental stewardship.”

In a press release, SFI stated the record-setting attempt is closely aligned with the organization’s important sustainability goals, as well as those of its partners in the communities.

The 202,935 trees planted as a result of this initiative will help to reduce carbon form the atmosphere and protect healthy habitats across Canada and the U.S.