Participants in the 12 and under category head out on their first lap around the course during the Sufferfest event at Rotary Park on Labour Day. Many kids took part in the event

September 2016

Events from in and around Nakusp during the month of September 2016

Centenary for Sandon hydroelectric station

When the generator at the Silversmith hydroelectric station in Sandon was installed in 1897, no one could have imagined it would still be generating power over 100 years later.

Originally, the station was powered by direct current (DC), but while DC is great for powering electric motors, or even a factory, a different kind of current was needed for the then boom town, which during its heyday had a population of around 10,000 people.

Over the last 15 years there has been an undertaking to replace the wood pipes with high-density polyethylene. Over 1,000 feet of pipe a year has been replaced. Currently, there is about 400 feet of wood pipe still being utilized.

Though Sandon is now a ghost town, the power station has never been shut down or decommissioned, and visitors from all over the world still visit for the chance to see Canada’s longest running machine.

 

Suffering never felt so good

It was a chilly Labour Day morning as residents of Nakusp and surrounding areas came to Rotary Park for the seventh annual Kootenay Sufferfest.

“It’s getting people out and having fun and being active and healthy,” said Janis Neufeld, one of the creators of Sufferfest.

When it was started, Sufferfest was one event on one weekend. Over the years it has evolved into an umbrella organization, hosting several weekend events around the area in the spring and summer season.

If this event was anything to go by, Sufferfest will continue for quite some time.

“There was a great vibe here today,” said Neufeld. “You can tell people are into this, bringing people here, having people in Nakusp. We want to share in what we’ve got, and I think we’ve got something special here.”

 

Orphaned bears safe and sound

Three black bear cubs are safe and sound after their mother was killed by a car near New Denver two weeks ago.

Three officers were dispatched to the area, and the cubs were found near the Kaslo-New Denver highway. They were then tranquilized and placed into a safe container.

“The cubs were put into a live bear trap, and were housed overnight in Castlegar,” said West Kootenay conservation officer Cynthia Mann. “I had made arrangements with Northern Lights, out of Smithers, for them to come and get the cubs.”

The cubs are being fed enough to ensure they reach the proper weight for when they go into hibernation, which will happen in November. Once they go into hibernation, they’ll sleep until the end of March or beginning of April, and will continue to be fed by the NLWS until they are released some time in June.

“That’s the time they would naturally leave their mothers, and they’re really primed to go and find their own territory,” said Langen.

It is anticipated the bears will integrate back into the wild after their release.