June 2015

Highlights from the month of June for the Arrow Lakes News Year in Review

Grad class of 2015 in their caps and gowns. The weather cleared long enough for a photo shoot before continuing with the festivities.

Toad talk fills NACFOR open house

The Western Toad was the hot topic at the NACFOR open house held on the evening of May 27. The usually sleepy event held at the Selkirk College campus in Nakusp was unusually filled with people and passionate discussion. Advocates concerned for the well-being of the blue-listed Western Toad had come to the open house to express their concerns to NACFOR about the harvesting planned to take place this year on the slopes south of Summit Lake.

In order to reduce the impact of its work, NACFOR is planning to log the seven blocks that are five to seven hectares in size, during the toads’ non-migratory periods, preferably in winter (when they hibernate), and to log blocks smaller in size than what forestry companies have normally cut.

Although NACFOR spokespeople say they have heard the toad advocates and changed how they will proceed, it was clear they were remaining firm; they will be submitting a cutting permit application this summer. NACFOR’s Frances Swan and Kathy Smith both said they really appreciated the level of engagement and open discussion at the open house.

Local fire department responds to fire outside town

On June 9 at approximately 7:37 p.m the Nakusp volunteer fire department responded to a 911 call reporting a wildfire at the Nakusp Rod and Gun club rifle range located just off highway 23. Upon arrival, it was discovered the fire reported was an escaped burn that had traveled a small distance away from a slash pile lit by Wildfire crews as part of their fuel management project. Working with 12 local firefighters and four pieces of equipment, the local fire department quickly brought the grass fire under control before handing the scene over to an Initial Attack Crew at around 8:15 p.m.

Grief is love that has become homeless

Making the first stop on her book tour, Amanda Bath visited the Nakusp Public Library on June 15 to share her experience as a survivor of the Johnson’s Landing slides in 2012 and to promote her memoir, Disaster in Paradise: The Landslides in Johnson’s Landing.

“This book is a love story,” Bath explained. “You wouldn’t imagine it, but it is a story about the love of place, the love of people, pets and your belongings. And it is about the things that help define you, the things around your home that make you who you are and then having all of that swept away in about 45 seconds.

Bath used the writing process as a form of healing from the trauma of the event and it got her through what she described as ‘a very, very dark time’, and is humbled by the reception that her work has been receiving.